An online campaign to raise money and support for moms and babies around the world.


$500,000

Raised through social shares.
It’s that easy: you share, J&J gives.


From May 4 to June 17, celebrities, community leaders, experts and parents will share their personal stories on what they wish were true for every child, everywhere.

Every time you like, tweet, comment or share a post on social media, Johnson & Johnson will donate $1 – up to $500,000 – to five causes that help improve the health and wellbeing of families worldwide: Shot@Life, Girl Up, Peace Corps Let Girls Learn Fund, U.S. Fund for UNICEF, and Nothing But Nets.

Use the Donate A Photo app and Johnson & Johnson will also donate $1 when you upload a photo for Girl Up, U.S. Fund for UNICEF or Nothing But Nets, up to $150,000. Make a difference in seconds, with the click of a mouse or snap of your smart phone.

Ready, set, share!

This year, we asked...

What do you wish were true for every child, everywhere?

Every Child Deserves to be Healthy and Safe

What I would wish were true for every child every where is access to health and safety. If a child is exposed to infectious diseases or war or violence or displacement — they’re caught. They’re stunted. But if a child has access to health and safety, they can thrive.

.@IMKristenBell kicks off the #GlobalMoms Relay w/ her video post. Share this post to support families. #JNJ

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

We Wish Every Child Had a Family That Cares

Dennis Ogbe is a USA Paralympian originally from Nigeria, polio survivor and father. Melody Butler is a registered nurse and infection preventionist. They sat down to talk about their hopes and dreams for their families and the world in support of the Global Moms Relay and the Shot@Life campaign.

In honor of #NursesWeek, our #GlobalMoms post is from nurse @MelodyButler & @dennisogbe. #JNJ

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

How My Mother Created the Space for Me to Lead

At the young age of 15 Alaa Murabit completed high school and moved from Saskatoon, Canada to Zawia, Libya. It was there that she enrolled in medical school and driven by her desire to create inclusive processes and institutions founded The Voice of Libyan Women (VLW) in 2011 at the age of 21. With a strong focus on challenging societal and cultural norms and utilizing traditional and historical role models Murabit champions women’s participation in peace processes and conflict mediation. Her programs, such as the ground breaking “Noor Campaign” are replicated internationally.

Nicknamed “The Libyan Doogie Howser” by Jon Stewart and applauded by Oprah for her innovative approach to security, Murabit acts as advisor to numerous international security boards, think tanks and organizations. Most recently she was nominated to the UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (women, peace and security) Global Advisory Board, UN Women Global Advisory Board and Harvard University’s “Everywoman, Everywhere” initiative. The first Ashoka Fellow elected from Libya, Murabit is the youngest recipient of the MarisaBellisario International Humanitarian Award by the Italian Government, was named the “International Trust Women Hero 2014” by The New York Times and “One of 25 women under 25 to watch” by Newsweek. Most recently she was selected as a “100 Top Woman” by the BBC and the SAFE Global Hero. In March 2015 Murabit was selected as the inaugural civil society speaker at the official Commission on the Status of Women opening session.

The first leader I ever met was my mother. Her life is a series of sacrifices that society often writes-off and disguises as the necessary duties of any woman. At 19, my mother left her own family and moved to Canada, a country where she didn’t know the language, or the people. By my age, now 26, she had lost a daughter, and she had me, her seventh child.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

What Does It Take to be “Lucky”?

Before joining the UN Foundation, Elizabeth Cousens served as U.S. Ambassador to the UN Economic and Social Council and Alternate Representative to the UN General Assembly (2012-14).

She previously served as Principal Policy Advisor and Counselor to the Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations, Susan Rice (2009-12). In this capacity, she was lead U.S. negotiator on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, including representing the United States in the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals. During her stint as ambassador, she led U.S. diplomacy at the UN on human rights, humanitarian, social and environmental issues; served on the boards of UN agencies, funds, and programmes, and was the U.S. representative to the UN Peacebuilding Commission. She was also sherpa to Ambassador Rice for the UN Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Global Sustainability.

Cousens’ has lived around the world, serving with UN political missions in Nepal and the Middle East and working as an analyst in conflict zones, including Bosnia and Haiti. Her prior experience includes Director of Strategy for the HD Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue which promotes and conducts mediation of armed conflict; Vice President of the International Peace Institute, where she led initiatives on global crisis management and UN reform; and Director of the Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum, a research group that provides country and regional expertise to the UN on conflict and crisis situations.

Dr. Cousens has a D.Phil. in International Relations from the University of Oxford, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and a B.A. in history and an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Puget Sound. She has written widely on conflict management, peace processes, state-building, and the United Nations.

She and her husband, Bruce Jones, have one child.

Moms can give their kids a brighter future by supporting the #globalgoals. #GlobalMoms #JNJ

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Why Our Children Need Us to Rally for Change

Zoe Saldana is the epitome of a true star in Hollywood, and has built her reputation as a versatile and respected actress by choosing roles that she feels passionately about. Saldana is currently in production in Marvel’s “Guardians of The Galaxy 2,” where she has reprised her critically acclaimed role of ‘Gamora.’ Saldana will once again star opposite Chris Pratt, Vin Diesel and Bradley Cooper. Recently, Saldana wrapped production on “Star Trek: Beyond,” the third installment to the 2009 blockbuster hit. Saldana will once again grace the silver screen as ‘Nyota Uhura’ opposite Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto. The J.J. Abrams’ action-packed film is slated for release in July 2016.

This past December, Saldana finished production for “Live By Night,” the directorial debut of Ben Affleck. The film focuses on a group of individuals during the Prohibition Era and their dealings in the world of organized crime. Saldana will star opposite Ben Affleck and Sienna Miller. The Warner Bros. film will debut in 2017. Additionally, Saldana completed work for the new music video from recording artist SIA. Zoe will star in emotional and cutting-edge video for “Free Me.” The music video will use it large-ranging platform to bring further awareness to the HIV epidemic as well as prove itself as a key aid in fundraising efforts for the ENDHIV Foundation. The video is slated for release in June 2016.

Saldana has also taken part in The Haiti Relief Inc which works tirelessly to provide disaster relief to Haiti after the devastating earthquake in 2010. The organization focuses on distributing medical supplies, food, clothing and other necessary items (such as soap, chlorine bleach, etc.) to aid and assist the residents of Haiti. The organization also assists in rebuilding schools, medical clinics and hospitals being the focus of the organization from relief to development.

Additionally, Saldana has participated development efforts with FINCA – an organization designed to alleviate poverty through lasting solutions to help build assets, create jobs and raise the standard of living. In 2010, Saldana spearheaded the “Lend a Hand” campaign – FINCA’s safe and easy to use online donation tool. The campaign allowed people to donate to FINCA and the women from around the world working to free their families from poverty to better the lives of their families.

Saldana was born and raised in New York. When not on location, she resides in Los Angeles with her husband and twin boys.

.@zoesaldana: "I want my boys to grow up happy, healthy & have the opportunity to be the “best” at something." #GlobalMoms #JNJ

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

6 Reasons to Invest in Children’s Heath and Education

It’s an exciting time to be a global entrepreneur. Around the world, business leaders are developing innovative new solutions to address the world’s major challenges. We asked six entrepreneurs from the United Nations Foundation’s Global Entrepreneurs Council, what they wished most for every child, every where. Here’s what they had to say.

6 reasons to invest in children's health & education. RT this story to support #GlobalMoms #JNJ #UNFGEC

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Inside the Lives of Syrian Refugee Girls and Women

Mr. Daniel Baker is Regional Humanitarian Coordinator for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), based in Amman, Jordan with particular responsibilities for response to the Syria crisis. He was assigned as Head of the UNFPA Jordan Country Office in April 2015. In addition to his responsibilities in helping to coordinate the Fund's sub-regional work to meet the maternal and reproductive health needs of affected populations in Syria, and addressing issues related to gender-based violence, Mr. Baker has oversight of UNFPA's long-term development program in Jordan and the humanitarian operations in that country to address the Syrian refugee crisis. Mr. Baker received his undergraduate degree in History from the University of Texas, Austin, and did his graduate studies in History and Linguistics at the University of Hawaii with further post-graduate study at the Universite de Moncton in Canada.

For the United Nations, Syria is the biggest humanitarian crisis today. As it enters its fifth year, the humanitarian impact in and around Syria remains overwhelming. It has placed 12.2 million people in need of aid, internally displaced 7.6 million people and caused 3.9 million Syrians to flee to neighboring countries.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Jennifer Lopez: We Can Empower Our Children Together

If I had a wish for every child, it would be that they have access to healthcare, education and most of all love. I want every child to be healthy, educated, safe and empowered. We have the ability to achieve these goals if we all come together to fight this fight. Together we are very powerful.

I am lucky that my family’s empowered values have allowed me to be a strong person. But becoming a mom is also the moment you realize that you are not as strong as you think. Suddenly, your heart lives outside of your body and your happiness becomes intertwined with the happiness of your children.

If I had a wish for every child, it would be that they have access to healthcare, education and most of all love. I want every child to be healthy, educated, safe and empowered. We have the ability to achieve these goals if we all come together to fight this fight. Together we are very powerful.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

A Mother’s Love Lasts Generations

My nana experienced three heart-breaking miscarriages and gave up on the possibility of bearing a child with her husband. Desperate to be parents they began the adoption process in Hartford Connecticut.

My mother, Patricia Ann was born June 3rd 1948, minutes before or after her twin sister Priscilla Margaret – no one remembers who came first. In the December of 1948, my mother and her sister were delivered in a basket to the door of my grandparents, Fay and Nicholas Bruno. They welcomed these two little girls with love, gratitude and hope for their new family. Soon after they renamed my mom as Donna Marie Bruno and my Aunty, Deborah Michelle Bruno.

My nana experienced three heart-breaking miscarriages and gave up on the possibility of bearing a child with her husband. Desperate to be parents they began the adoption process in Hartford Connecticut. My mother, Patricia Ann was born June 3rd 1948, minutes before or after her twin sister Priscilla Margaret – no one remembers who came first. In the December of 1948, my mother and her sister were delivered in a basket to the door of my grandparents, Fay and Nicholas Bruno. They welcomed these two little girls with love, gratitude and hope for their new family. Soon after they renamed my mom as Donna Marie Bruno and my Aunty, Deborah Michelle Bruno.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Why Does Education Matter? Ask These Global Teen Girls!

Girl Up teens from around the world share their answers to: What do you wish were true for every child, everywhere?

Not all girls have the chance to go to school. Equal access to education for girls is a human right, and also the pathway to achieving progress in all other areas. Worldwide, 62 million girls are not in school.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

All Children Deserve Equal Access to Education

Tonia Wellons has successfully straddled international development and locally oriented community-based development with full intention, skillfully borrowing lessons from one and applying them to the other. With 18 years of development experience, spanning senior leadership roles at the World Bank Group -- to social entrepreneur for a community-based social fund that she founded -- Tonia is skilled in leading global development alliances, managing multi-donor operations, and engaging local communities.
Tonia currently serves as Associate Director, Office of Strategic Partnerships for the Peace Corps and is responsible for leading the agency’s partnerships with government, the private sector, international NGO’s, and the broader volunteer- sending community. The OSP team is tasked with facilitating strategic opportunities that advance Peace Corps’ mission and the role of volunteerism as a tool for development.
Tonia served as Fund Manager for CGAP, a multi-donor initiative focused on financial access and inclusion, housed at the World Bank Group. She spent a significant part of her career as working on USAID-funded capacity development initiatives during the immediate post-apartheid era in South Africa. Her work in South Africa with local government associations and City Managers (in the US and South Africa) successfully led to a pipeline of local talent for municipal leadership during this new democracy’s most significant transition period. While living in South Africa, Tonia was able to leverage that experience to establish ‘south-south’ partnerships with municipal government entities and partners in neighboring Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Swaziland.
Tonia has led Youth Employment, Leadership, Talent Development, and Social Entrepreneurship initiatives for a broad range of US communities and continues to serve as advisor on youth leadership and civic engagement programs locally in Prince George’s County, Maryland. Tonia has a Master’s Degree in Public Administration and International Development Policy from the University of Delaware, and has also attained a BA in Political Science from North Carolina A&T State University.

My wish for every child, everywhere, is to have equal access to high quality education and safe spaces to grow and learn. As a mother of teenage girls, I am particularly passionate about girls’ education.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Speak Up and Speak Out: Girls Can Make Change Too

Trisha Chang is a Peace Corps Volunteer and native San Franciscan. After two years as a Health sector Volunteer with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Trisha now serves at the Peace Corps office as a Cross-sectoral Programming Priorities Peace Corps Volunteer Leader; specializing in youth empowerment and gender equality. She holds a degree in Early Child Development from University of California – Davis.

Josephine, Girl Group Participant and Leader, is a 19 year-old student from Wakiso District, just outside of Kampala, Uganda. In October 2015, after many years participating in Peace Corps-supported girls’ empowerment clubs, Josephine decided to start her own community-based organization called YIELD “Youth in Empowerment and Leadership Development”. YIELD works through local schools to empower young people, like its founder, to better understand health issues like HIV/AIDs and malaria, as well as take on leadership roles in their community.

Growing up in Uganda, many girls face challenges. For example, girls will leave school because of menstruation. In homes, there are challenges because of gender. At home girls have to do the domestic work, they don’t have to go to school. They just (get told they) need to be married and do housework, and that affects their education. It hurts me so much when I see an African girl suffering that much.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Lady Gaga’s Mom On Empowering Youth, Inspiring Kindness

Cynthia Bissett Germanotta is President and Co-founder of Born This Way Foundation, which was launched alongside her daughter, Stefani (Lady Gaga), in 2012 with the passionate intent to “empower youth” and “inspire kindness and bravery.” Under her leadership, Born This Way Foundation has established connections with over 150,000 young people and partners, conducted cutting edge research and been the recipient of numerous honors, including the Family Online Safety Institute’s award for Outstanding Achievement in 2012, the National Association of School Psychologists Special Friend to Children Award for 2013, and the Anti-Defamation League’s 2015 No Place for Hate Making a Difference Award. She was most recently honored by Dancing Classrooms and Greater Boston PFLAG for her advocacy for youth in the mental health space. Germanotta is a former telecommunications executive whose career in sales & management spanned twenty-five years.

A graduate of West Virginia University, Mrs. Germanotta went on to earn her Masters Degree in Public Administration from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., matriculating from both undergraduate and graduate schools with honors. Mrs. Germanotta has been an advocate for the Women’s Council on Heart Health for the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute, in addition to being on the Board of the Empowerment Initiative at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She also served on the Ladies Auxiliary Committee of The Columbus Citizens Foundation – as well as receiving the CCF’s Humanitarian Award for 2015 - and is a member of the Board of Governors for the Parsons New School of Design.

As a mom, it is difficult to watch your child struggle. Sometimes, the obstacles they face are physical. But the mental and emotional challenges are just as heartbreaking and frustrating to witness.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Queen Rania: Refugee Children Deserve Better

In addition to being a wife and mother, Queen Rania works hard to lift the lives of Jordanians by supporting their endeavours and helping to create new opportunities for them. Locally, she is committed to breathe new life into the public education system; empower communities and women especially through microfinance initiatives; protect children and families; and drive innovation, technology and entrepreneurship, especially amongst young people.

Internationally, Queen Rania is an advocate for tolerance, compassion and bridge building between people of all cultures and backgrounds. Her efforts to simultaneously challenge stereotypes of Arabs and Muslims, and promote greater understanding and acceptance between people of all faiths and cultures, have won her global recognition.

Her Majesty’s passion is education. She believes that every Jordanian girl and boy, and all children, should have access not only to stimulating classrooms and modern curricula, but inspiring teachers and technology that can connect Jordan’s children to the world and the world to Jordan’s children. Her efforts in the education sector complement the work of the Ministry of Education through initiatives such as the Jordan Education Initiative, the Queen Rania Teachers Academy, Madrasati, Edraak and others. To realize these and so much more, Queen Rania has encouraged private sector partners to drive improvements and strengthen the foundations of Jordan’s education system. (Queen Rania’s Initiatives)

Imagine you are six years old, four feet tall and too young to truly know what’s going on. Your childhood soundtrack has been the drumbeat of distant bomb blasts. One day your mother tells you you’re going away, somewhere safe.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

I Wish Every Child Had Freedom to Dream

Jane Griffiths is the first female Company Group Chairman of Janssen in EMEA, the pharmaceutical division of the Johnson & Johnson family. She is responsible for this business across the entire region. Her personal approach focuses on sustainability, accountability, openness and collaboration, and she is leading Janssen EMEA to live these values. Jane has held a number of senior sales, marketing and research & development positions including International Vice President for Western Europe and South Africa, and Head of Market Access for Janssen EMEA.

She is a sponsor for the Women’s Leadership Initiative in Janssen. Other industry roles include past Chairwoman of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) Executive Committee and past Chairwoman of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) Europe Committee. Jane is a sponsor of the Johnson & Johnson Global Pharmaceuticals Sustainability Council. Jane is also Chair of the Johnson & Johnson Corporate Citizenship Trust in EMEA and a Board member.

Completing her PhD in Plant Biochemistry at the University of Aberystwyth, UK in 1982, Jane Griffiths started her Johnson & Johnson career as a sales representative.

Growing up surrounded by a menagerie of cats, dogs, bantams, horses, and rescued wildlife, I learned to love our beautiful environment and how we must strive to preserve it. As a child, I happily spent all day riding ponies through the gorgeous countryside of rural Herefordshire, England. That sense of freedom was (and still is) one of the things that fueled my happiness. In order for future generations to have the same freedom to enjoy our wild places, we must make sure that we take care of our planet.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

What Being a Mom Has Taught Me About Food

Lauren Bush Lauren is the Founder and CEO of FEED, a social business whose mission is to "Create good products that help FEED the world." After traveling around the world with the UN World Food Programme as a student, Lauren was inspired to create a consumer product that would engage people in the seemingly overwhelming fight to end world hunger. In 2007, FEED was founded with every product sold having a measurable donation attached to it. To date, the social business has been able to provide over 90 million meals globally through the WFP and Feeding America. Lauren lives in NYC where she works on FEED and other socially conscious business ventures, she is also a Founding member of UNICEF Next Generation.

One thing that initially surprised me about motherhood was how much time, energy and care is required to feed my baby. I know this might sound naïve, but before James, I had no idea what a big deal it was to keep a little one fed. Minutes after I gave birth, a nurse placed James in my arms and told me that he was hungry. This great responsibility, which my body had managed on autopilot while he was in my womb, was now my main job as his mama. Whether you breastfeed, bottle-feed or go straight to formula, the first responsibility of being a mommy is clearly that of Chief FEEDer.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

How My Mother Laura Bush Raised Me to Care for Global Families

Jenna Hager is a contributing correspondent on NBC's Today show and an editor-at-large for Southern Living magazine. She is also the author of The New York Times best seller Ana's Story: A Journey of Hope, which she wrote after traveling to Latin America in 2006 as an intern with UNICEF. Ana's Story is based on the life of a 17-year-old single mother with HIV, who struggles to shield her child from the life she had of abuse and neglect. Hager remains involved with UNICEF and is the Founding Chair of UNICEF Next Generation, an initiative dedicated to motivating younger generations to help save and improve children’s lives around the world.

Hager holds a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Texas at Austin. She is also co-author of two children’s books: Read All About It! and Our Great Big Backyard. Hager is the daughter of former U.S. President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush. In 2008, she married Henry Hager and they now live in NYC with their daughters Margaret Laura "Mila" and Poppy Louise.

I come from a long line of strong women. My mom has the unbelievable gift of quiet grace. When I was a teenager, she noticed how much I adored children: how my face lit when I was in a room with them, how my voice softened. So she gently, subtly took me to a place called The Austin Children's Shelter, a home for kids who are abused or neglected. She didn't demand I work there; instead she merely suggested it, knowing I would love nothing more. And (of course) she was right. I spent every Sunday of my senior year of high school there and it changed the trajectory of my career. I knew I wanted to work in education.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

It Took Seeing My Infant Daughter in a NICU

UNICEF's Ethiopia office team share the tragedies of the current drought and ongoing humanitarian crisis in Ethiopia.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Amidst a Drought, a Routine Service Saves Lives

Bethlehem Kiros is a representative for UNICEF.

Sitting on the steps of the Arara Kidanemeheret Health Post in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, Belay Munaye is nursing her one-year-old twins while waiting to receive their monthly food support. She named her twin boys Tarik and Misgan, meaning ‘history made’ and ‘thankfulness’ to remind herself of the miracle of twin birth and her gratefulness for surviving it. Belay says she is even more thankful that her children have survived in these trying times of drought and food shortage. She suspects that she might have lost at least one of them if it had not been for the intervention of the health workers of Arara Kidanemeheret Kebele.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Actress Nia Long Takes a Stand for Healthy, Safe Children

Since making her film debut in John Singleton’s Oscar nominated film, “Boyz In The Hood,” Nia Long continues to cultivate a versatile resume in both film and television. On the big screen, Long will next be seen opposite Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele in New Line’s feature comedy, “Keanu.” No stranger to box office success, Long has been a part of three successful film franchises including the “The Best Man” for which she earned an NAACP Image Award for “Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture” and its 2013 follow-up “The Best Man Holiday” which earned critical and commercial success. Martin Lawrence’s “Big Momma’s House 1 & 2” collectively earned over $300 million and earned Long an NAACP Image Award nomination for “Outstanding Lead Actress in a Motion Picture.” Additionally, Long co-starred in the Ice Cube family comedies, “Are We There Yet?” and “Are We Done Yet” which spawned the TBS comedy series, “Are We There Yet?” Most recently, Long starred in “The Single Moms Club” which she co-starred with her son, Massai, and additional film roles include “Friday” with Ice Cube and Chris Tucker, “Made in America” with Whoopi Goldberg, “Love Jones” which won the Audience Award at Sundance and earned Long an NAACP Image Award nomination for “Outstanding Lead Actress in a Motion Picture,” “Soul Food,” “Stigmata,” “The Secret Laughter of Women” opposite Colin Firth, “Alfie” with Jude Law and “Premonition” with Sandra Bullock.

In addition to her film and television work, Long’s passion lies in supporting her community. With her family roots in Trinidad, she aims to be the liaison between the youth in the United States and on the island of Trinidad. In 2013, Long was a vocal proponent to the Barack Obama reelection campaign and has remained active in supporting women’s rights, education and affordable healthcare.

A Brooklyn native, Long resides in Los Angeles with her two sons and fiancée Ime Udoka, assistant coach for the San Antonio Spurs.

I grew up in South Central Los Angeles and I remember what it was like to feel unsafe. Often times I would come home from school to an empty house. My mother was a single mom, a city bus driver, and worked late hours. Gang violence was a sad reality and drug deals were regularly made on the corner near the park I walked through to get home. I would run home as fast as I could without looking back, without making eye contact, in fear.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Why I Fight for Refugees

Thon Moses Chol is a former "Lost Boy" from South Sudan who was resettled to the United States in 2000. When the war in Sudan reached Mr. Chol's village in 1987, he was forced to flee alone and fend for himself at an early age. After years of treacherous travel between Sudan, Ethiopia, and Kenya, Mr. Chol was finally resettled as an unaccompanied refugee minor in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Although adjusting to life in the United States was difficult at first, he attributes his success to his strong support system.

He graduated with a B.A., and a Master's Degree in Social Work from Western Michigan University, in 2006 and in 2008 respectively. He currently works as a Vocational Specialist for the Washington D.C. government. Additionally, Rev. Chol is an ordained Minister at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, Virginia, U.S.A. The Lutheran Immigration & Refugee Service (LIRS) honored him in 2011 with the Spirit of Welcome Award, and he was nominated to the LIRS Board of Directors (2012-2014).
In 2010, Mr. Chol testified before United States Congress about the refugee crisis in Sudan and has been an Advisory Board member of Refugee Congress. Through the years he has appeared on BBC world news, Al-Jazeera, ABC news; also has been featured on The New York Times Magazine, The Washington times, Detroit Free Press. Above all, his passion is being a refugee advocate/spokesperson; being a voice for the voiceless.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

No Child Should Die From a Mosquito Bite

Anthony Tolliver is from Springfield, MO and graduated from Creighton University before entering the NBA with the San Antonio Spurs in 2008. Tolliver just completed his 8th season in the NBA, playing in 455 games. Tolliver and his wife Jessica have 2 children; a son, Isaiah, and a daughter, Lennox. This season, Tolliver became a Nothing But Nets champion for the United Nations Foundation and pledged to donate 3 lifesaving bed nets for every 3-pointer he made.

I have been a professional athlete for years now, but nothing has been more important to me than making sure I inspire the next generation of children to know that they have the power to make a difference in the world. What I wish for every child, everywhere is the opportunity to know they can make a difference. We get so caught up by the great problems of the world that it’s difficult to feel our own influence — that our own abilities and efforts won’t have an impact or create change. But I have seen firsthand how much of a difference just one person can make.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

Paying Fatherhood Forward

As a man of faith and strong family values, Allan Houston lives his life with a determination to utilize his success as a professional athlete to help others while continuing to grow a variety of entrepreneurial interests. Recently appointed as the Assistant General Manager of the New York Knicks as well as the General Manager of the Westchester Knicks, Allan has been an international ambassador for the NBA, spokesperson for the National Fatherhood Initiative, ESPN analyst, and burgeoning book author. Allan continues to share his experience and life perspectives with an ever-growing audience. Before his retirement in the Fall of 2005, Allan was touted as one of the “purest shooters” in the NBA, finishing his career as one of the NBA’s all-time greatest long-range shooters (#11 in three pointers made) and one of the all-time leading scorers in Knicks history (#2 in three pointers, #4 in total points, and #8 in scoring average). Allan is a two-time NBA All-Star, and in his last healthy season (2002-03) finished as the 10th leading scorer in the league. But for all his accomplishments he is especially proud of being named one of The Sporting News’ “Good Guys in Sports” (four times) and helping Team USA bring home the gold medal in the 2000 Summer Olympics games in Sydney, Australia. Allan’s dedication to helping others is demonstrated through the exciting work of his Legacy Foundation, which has served over 1,500 participants across the country through original programs in fatherhood and entrepreneurship to facilitate individual and collective growth through initiatives that – 1) Restore a strong family unit, 2) Provide economic empowerment through entrepreneurship, 3) Encourage education and life skill development, and 4) Enhance spiritual growth. The “Father Knows Best” Basketball Retreat & FISLL Curriculum provides a unique combination of basketball and relationship building activities for fathers and children, and mentors and mentees emphasizing leadership, communication, and the importance of spending quality time together. The Business Education and Development Programs offers a one-of-a-kind opportunity for entrepreneurial advancement where aspiring entrepreneurs receive six months of education, training, mentoring and incubation support to launch their business. Through the success of his philanthropy, Allan was named “Father of the Year” by the National Fatherhood Initiative in 2007, “Social Entrepreneur of the Year” by Tulane University in 2008, and received the President’s Council on Service and Civic Engagement Award from the Obama Administration in 2011. In 2015, Houston was honored by the Tennessee State Legislature for his extraordinary work in the community and with his foundation. With a strong entrepreneurial spirit inherited from his parents, Allan continues to build and expand Allan Houston Enterprises which has maintained strong interest in apparel; UNK NBA (an NBA licensed fashion line), and an advisory position with Top Gunn Leather and apparel; urban inspirational media content and aggregation; and a variety of public speaking and media projects Allan is currently co-producing a film project addressing fatherlessness as a social, spiritual, and educational stronghold.

If you have seven kids, you either really, really love being a father, or you’re trying to acquire your own basketball team the old-fashioned way. If you’re Allan Houston, it’s both. Houston’s love and basketball story starts with his parents. His father, Wade, was part of the first class of African American basketball signees at the University of Louisville in 1962. His mother, Alice, grew up in Louisville two houses down from the Clays — yes, the Cassius Clays — and Allan spent his earliest years in that house on Grand Avenue, where the families were tight. In 1989, the University of Tennessee made Wade the first African American head coach in the Southeast Conference, and he brought along Allan, a freshly minted state champion and Kentucky’s scholastic Mr. Basketball.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

How Our Collective Action Can Change the World

Chrysula is the Global Moms Challenge community manager. She is passionate about social media as a way to raise action and awareness for the world's big problems and solutions. She has four children and believes that when you wake up a mother, you wake up the world.

For the first time in history, individuals have the tools and the platforms needed to react and respond to our governments. Social media has given us a way to discuss the issues that matter the most to us. When we stand together, the impact is significant. Policies are enacted, change can take place. Which is why your participation in the Global Moms Relay is crucial.

Read Article

Give $1 by sharing

This photo helps keep a girl in Guatemala in school
Donate a Photo - Johnson & Johnson

Use the app and for every photo you share, Johnson & Johnson donates $1 to a cause you want to help.

Johnson & Johnson has curated a list of trusted causes, and you can donate a photo to one cause, once a day. Each cause will appear in the app until it reaches its goal, or the donation period ends. If the goal isn't reached, the cause will still get a minimum donation.

Want to know how the relay works?
WATCH
You share a story, Johnson & Johnson gives $1.
This is where your dollar goes:

* Use of the Peace Corps name or logo does not constitute or imply a social or personal endorsement by the Peace Corps, the United States or its officers or employees of Johnson & Johnson/United Nations Foundation or any related product, person, or service.

Moms+SocialGood
The relay was kicked off by Moms+SocialGood, a one-day event dedicated to the power of motherhood.
See highlights from the event.
Learn More
Join the conversation using #GlobalMoms

    Brought to you by

    with support from

    Get Involved Today
    Want to learn more about our campaign? Sign up for our newsletter (we promise not to overdo it).
    It's an easy way to help moms and babies!